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extra hyper dog : German Shepherd
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extra hyper dog

Discuss issues you have on our German Shepherd forum chat board. We want to gather breed specific chats and discussions here. German Shepherd health issues of health, breed specific training or behavior problems.

extra hyper dog

Postby radjess331 » Mon Aug 21, 2006 5:39 pm

Hi i have a really hyper dog. He runs around non stop and wont ever just lay down. He nips at you instead of trying to lick you. He also has a problem with chewing on electrical cords like a lamps cord. What should i do? I would like him to be inside with me but he is just to hyper.
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Postby LabLover » Mon Aug 21, 2006 5:43 pm

How old is your dog?
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Postby radjess331 » Mon Aug 21, 2006 5:48 pm

he is about 1and a half to two years old
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Postby Lindsay » Mon Aug 21, 2006 5:56 pm

How old is he?

Okay, you need to approach training this dog as you would a toddler. Generally, dogs have the mentality of a 3 year old child. I would start crate training him if you haven't already. This way, at night, or when you are gone, he is safe and unable to get into trouble. I would provide him with several durable chew toys.

When you are home, I would contain him to the room you are in. Baby gates work great, or even a large piece of cardboard works well in blocking doorways. Again, make sure that he has something to occupy his mouth. Several brisk walks a day will help him burn some energy. Remember that excersie, especially with this breed, is very important. If you catch him chewing on something other than his toy, scold him with a firm no, then replace that object with his toy. Reward his good behavior with praise and treats. Cherrios work well as a reward.

I raised a Siberian Husky who, as a pup, had the same behavioral problems. She chewed through walls, phone cords, light cords... you name it. Those were the tactics I used and she because a very well behaved adult dog that I could trust alone in my home.

You can also consult with your Vet and, or a behavioral specialist.

Remember to be consistant and patient. Let us know how he progresses.
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Postby radjess331 » Mon Aug 21, 2006 6:14 pm

ok thank you for the advice. ill go and buy a crate for him today. :D
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Postby Lindsay » Mon Aug 21, 2006 6:42 pm

I was posting when the other two posted came up. ;)

I see how old he is now.
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Postby Luba Puppy » Mon Aug 21, 2006 8:11 pm

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Postby bradfran » Mon Aug 21, 2006 9:57 pm

Obedience training and crate training. For obedience, sign up for a course tought by a professional, the majority of obedience training is training the owner. Your dog is not hyper, he/she just has no boundaries or respect for the ones you THINK he/she has.
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Postby Mugsy » Tue Aug 22, 2006 2:33 am

How old is the dog? What breed?
Have you tried professional obedience training?
Is he getting enough attention? Is he getting enough exercise? Long walks?


EDIT: I see people beat my post and asked the same questions... :D
Not trying to be redundant. :wink:
Last edited by Mugsy on Wed Sep 27, 2006 2:48 am, edited 1 time in total.
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huh?

Postby rahann » Sun Sep 24, 2006 8:56 am

bradfran wrote:Obedience training and crate training. For obedience, sign up for a course tought by a professional, the majority of obedience training is training the owner. Your dog is not hyper, he/she just has no boundaries or respect for the ones you THINK he/she has.





i completely disagree. I have a 3 year old dutch shepherd trained in san francisco in the K9 force, trained a year with me, who knows boundries and respect and LOVE for myself and my family. but she is a big dog and can get extremely hyper. she understands in home to never chew anything that is not given to her, i trained her from wanting to chace and fight the cats to being able to lay down next to them. but when shes outside, she can be very hyper, wanting to run around and be free. i dont feel that she does not have any respect or boundies with me, but just like you and me, needs to have a chance to go insane and wild, if only for a few minutes. to have a dog unallowed to ever spread its beautiful legs and sore would be the problem, not the dog having no respect or boundries.
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Postby meezermom » Mon Sep 25, 2006 1:59 am

Crate training never hurt any dog. It gives them their own space and a nice place for time outs. However, all dogs need to be able to run off excess energy....and heaven knows, a year and a half old dog has lots of that to burn!
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Postby bradfran » Mon Sep 25, 2006 2:15 am

Most people who claim their GSD (or most breeds) is hyper are just ignorant and THINK their GSD is hyper when it is a normal example of the breed. Dutch Shepherds (like Belgian Shepherds) are higher energy than what most people think of as a GSD (Dutch and Belgians are not the same as GSD's). My male GSD can beat a Malinois or Dutchy any day of the week and most would consider him hyper. There is a difference. Proper training (being trained to be a K9 means nothing unless you were his trainer) and exercise will fix the problem.
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Postby meezermom » Tue Sep 26, 2006 2:57 am

Vida, our late SAR dog, was soooo hyper she would drive any sane person to drink. That is why she was a SAR dog! That intense drive to constantly be doing things was what helps make a good working dog.. a companion dog may not have that high of a working drive. The breeder of my three girls has said that no GSD is fully mature mentally or physically until they are around three years old. So they are very active and need to be challenged mentally and physically. It is normal for these dogs to be that way. There are some that are not but they are not really average for the breed. The breed average is a pretty high energy dog. So the best thing to do is find an outlet for his or her energy. Consider obedience or rally training. If Flyball is popular where you are, get into that... Most young GSD's are not going to be satisfied with a 15 minute walk once a day......
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Postby bearlasmommy » Tue Sep 26, 2006 11:46 pm

One of the best qualities of this breed is its never ending energy and zest for life. They love to experience new things all the time, they love to stay busy and just when you think they are going to wind down and have a nap they will find something else to do. My little girl just turned one and she is constantly following our rescued kitten all over the house. She often sleeps with it in between her paws. I will be having her spayed soon, regretfully, but it is the responsible thing to do. I have the option and capabilities to breed her but i did not buy her for that purpose. I took her into our lives so that we could love her and cherish her the way GSDs should be. I am also thinking seriously about spayinng her as wll because her hormones are pretty high and she keeps getting a rash around her vulva and lower belly. The vet has assured me that once she is spayed the rash will disapear. :D :D :D
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Postby meezermom » Wed Sep 27, 2006 2:40 am

Boy, you hit that on the head! Zest for life is the perfect description of these dogs!! They seem to have a real delight in everything! Skylar discovered her first cricket in the house yesterday and was a total source of laughter and delight while the cricket stood her off..... :lol: Tasha, even with her knees being not so good still has a real delight in doing things and while she moves slower, she is still game! She thrives on going shopping to all the pet stores and where ever she can go and showing off......GSD's are the meaning of a true companion
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